Skip to content

Werner Herzog Reading Cormac McCarthy on a Science Radio Show

April 10, 2011

Because, I mean, obviously, right? Why  wouldn’t that happen?

Here is the awesome episode of Science Friday, in which Werner, Cormac, and physicist Lawrence Krauss discuss where science meets art:

It’s a terrific episode, and I particularly like the beginning bit where they discuss how scientists and artists are so often interested in the same questions. It’s almost as good as the last bit where Werner monopolizes the microphone and describes the “unfriendliness” of the universe. Anyway, I had this epiphany one day when I realized that what Ethan and I do are kind of inverses of each other. Ethan’s a fiction writer, and I feel like he describes incredibly specific situations and relationships in his stories that evoke some more general human truth (although I highly doubt that is how he would describe his own work). What I do (or try to do)  is get inspiration from specific situations, and then try to find the general human pattern behind them with science.  Wow, that’s profound. I probably am the first person to ever think about this.  It’s clearly a sign that I should give up on psychology and write a grand theory of art science or science art or start colleges of arts and sciences. . . .oh, wait.

Anyway, it might not be anything new, but I get all geeked out over this stuff. Also, I’m game for anything that prompts Cormac McCarthy say things like “the so-called Higgs mechanism is what is responsible for bringing the masses to the particles.”

Advertisements
No comments yet

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: